Is Leopard Apple’s Vista?

As I write this, I’m installing Leopard on my Mac Pro, having used it since release on my MacBook Pro, so you can take that as my firm “no” vote.

Here’s what’s wrong with Leopard as far as I’m concerned:

1) The translucent menu bar is a bit ugly. I think I’ll use a command line hack to fix it.

2) The dock with reflections (on the bottom of the screen) looks stupid. I’ve moved my dock to the left side of the screen, which works well and looks fine. I should have done it years ago (when I started using 16:9 aspect ratio displays) but Leopard forced me to do that, or use a command line hack to fix that as well.

3) Until 10.5.1 came out, my MacBook wasn’t going to sleep properly. Now fixed.

Aside from that, Leopard has three compelling features that I was missing terribly when using Tiger:

1) Apple tweaked spotlight to work as an app launcher. I far prefer the improved Spotlight to QuickSilver. If OS X were open source this would have been backported to Tiger, but Apple prefers to make money. Oh well.

2) Stacks are great (if I could customize the icon of a stack they’d be perfect). They finally eliminate the need for something to replace OS 9’s wonderful but flawed tabbed Finder windows and the Apple menu, and they’re better than either.

3) Spaces is the first virtual display solution I’ve ever not given up using after a week. The ability to have apps automatically launch into specific workspaces, integration with Expose, is very good (not perfect).

Here’s what’s great about Vista compared with XP:

Nothing, although I do prefer Aero to XP’s default theme visually (there’s a low bar). I find the blurry window frames very distracting and ugly, and running Vista the laptop I use it on runs hot if I open a text editor.

Here’s what’s wrong with Vista:

1) Sluggish waking from sleep.

2) Idiotic confirmation dialogs.

3) Idiotic automatic updates are basically about as bad as having viruses on your computer installed by the Vendor. Only you could clean viruses off your system; this crap is working as intended.

I don’t hate Vista. I don’t prefer XP. Both are pretty decent … for Windows.

Safari for Windows, Mac, and probably iPhone found to have tons of security holes

As noted here and many other places, Safari turns out to be full of security flaws at least some of which are in the production (2.0.4) version as well as the 3.0 “beta” (it doesn’t show beta in its About box).

Safari on Windows is proving pretty buggy for me, it doesn’t save preference changes among other things. (Ironically, it crashes when I try to view a MacWorld Blog page complaining about the uninspiring announcements at WWDC.) Personally, I think it’s nice to see security flaws in Safari exposed because, hopefully, Apple will be forced to fix them. The nastiest exploit I’ve seen tricks Safari into running arbitrary command lines under Windows (via cmd.exe).

Windows on the Mac, Revisited

One of the comments on a recent post points out that he (or she?) has blogged on this topic before and in more detail. (I’m hardly the first to observe that WINE, Crossover, et al are, at least conceptually, a far better solution to this problem than Parallels or Boot Camp.)

However, on reading his comments, which I summarize below as five reasons Apple should do this and five reasons it shouldn’t (I’ve paraphrased and renumbered):

Reasons it Should

1. The hard work is done (WINE etc.)
2. Since they’re dropping Classic support…
3. Vista will not support EFI in first release…
4. Apple desperately wants to break into the Enterprise market…
5. Leopard seems to have few compelling new features

Reasons it Shouldn’t

6. Fear of Microsoft retaliating
7. Support would be a nightmare
8. Microsoft’s Mac Business Unit would be alienated
9. Not a new issue and they’ve never done it before
10. It’s not very Apple

Here’s my reaction to said reasons.
1. Agreed.
2. That’s just stupid. It’s not a reason.
3. Irrelevant.
4. Yes, but so what?
5. So, you know what’s in Leopard?!
6. Far-fetched. What could Microsoft try* to do that’s more malicious than “Zune”?
7. Absolutely true and a good point. Might have to be a free download “beta” like Boot Camp.
8. Possibly true.
9. Completely and utterly wrong. Aside from some horrible kludges (like Mac Charlie and the PC compatibility card for early PowerPC Macs) which were essentially low-end PCs that shared the Mac’s monitor, Apple has never had x86 CPUs in its machines, and Mac OS has never run on x86 CPUs.
10. Simply a matter of opinion, and I think far MORE Apple like than Boot Camp or Apple’s previous PC compatibility efforts.
* Actually, Zune is probably a gift for Apple, since the real victims are PlaysForSure licensees. But I doubt Microsoft considered Apple’s feelings.

Mentioned, but not enumerated, is a very important reason — the fact that a company which is on the cusp of developing a native Mac version of a program might decide simply to support the Mac’s Win32 compatibility layer instead. This is a real issue, but it’s not really clear that it doesn’t already exist because of Parallels and Boot Camp. If it’s a key productivity app, then chances are you’ll want it native. Photoshop native is going to kick pretend Photoshop native for the foreseeable future.

The Bottom Line

Apple’s core PC market is people who buy their own computers or can tell their company which computer to buy for them. The whole enterprise thing is never going to work out because enterprise IT hates, loathes, and fears Apple (subject of another blog post I think 🙂 ).

There are a certain number of people out there who want to use both a Mac and a PC for whatever reason. (I’m one of them.) You can only really use one at a time. I would argue that the vast majority of these people want to use their Macs for almost everything and their PCs for gaming and/or 3D apps (like 3DS Max) and one or two random Windows-only apps.

At the moment, Apple and Dell (say) are selling these folks two computers every X months for 1.7Y dollars. If Apple can produce a computer for Y dollars that serves all these people’s needs then their customers will be very happy, and either upgrade more frequently or buy a higher end computer. In my case I’d also save on desk space, power bills, fan noise, and carpet wear from sliding my chair from desk to desk).

If Apple is working on this, it’s doing a very good job of keeping it secret (e.g. it is either doing it from scratch — unlikely — or working on Open Source projects and either not pushing back its changes or somehow concealing its contributions or working with someone like Codeweavers and maintaining absolute radio silence). So it probably isn’t. That said, the solution I’m describing is going to happen whether Apple does it or not. So all the arguments against it are, in the end, irrelevant.

Running Windows Apps on a Mac & Other Stories

One of the best stories I’ve heard about Apple’s history concerns Ellen Hancock, whom Gil Amelio brought into Apple as Chief Technology Officer. Her role is pretty much overlooked these days, but she is responsible for pulling the plug on Copland, looking for a viable replacement, and — ultimately — acquiring NeXT, Steve Jobs, and Avie Tevanian (her successor).

Anyway, back to the story which I am reciting from memory. Ellen Hancock comes in to work and she is the most senior woman — ever — at Apple, surrounded by a lot of cocksure guys. She holds a meeting with her key reports and during the meeting utters the following statement. “One of the things that’s always puzzled me about Macs is why when I have a Windows .exe file on my desktop and I double-click it, it doesn’t just work.” The reaction is one of utter consternation. How could anyone working at Apple, let alone its new Chief Techology Officer, be so utterly clueless. And then it starts to dawn on them:

1) She has a PhD in Maths.
2) She has done serious shit at IBM.
3) She’s right.

Not long after this, Virtual PC added a feature which actually allowed .exe files to “just work” if you double-clicked them. It was a horrible kludge — you double-clicked the .exe and Virtual PC (which claimed ownership of that type of file) launched, loaded up the last version of Windows you had run with it, booted Windows, copied the .exe file over to some place Windows (under VPC) could see it, and then attempted to execute it. If the .exe required a bunch of local context to work (as most Windows .exes do) it quite likely crashed.

But the principle was there.

The only word we’ve seen from Apple on Windows compatibility lately is (a) Bootcamp — a pretty much wholly unsatisfactory option for serious users (it’s a great security blanket for switchers). (I am not going to reboot my Mac to run some dumb Windows app; I hardly reboot my Mac at all period. If a Mac OS update requires a reboot, I often leave the dialog up for days before I finally click “Restart”…); (b) pushing Parallels Workstation — almost as unsatistfactory as Bootcamp since it won’t run games, which are Windows’s killer app; and (c) a statement by Phil Schiller that Apple is not going to implement virtualization in Leopard.

So Apple has implemented one pretty much lousy option, is pushing a second, also lousy option, and has denied that it will implement the second lousy option itself.

What Apple hasn’t denied, because no-one has asked, is whether it will implement the correct answer to Hancock’s question — a Win32 compatibility box in the Mac OS X block diagram. You know, those rectangular diagrams which show “QuickTime” in a box that is kind of offset on top of another box labelled “Quartz”. The one with “Carbon” and “Cocoa” sitting side-by-side.

This isn’t the stuff of Science Fiction or a bad rumor page. It has existed under UNIX for years, Linux for not-so-many years, and is currently available for free as Open Source WINE (WINE is not an Emulator) and in various commercial forks. Apple in fact used to sell an equivalent product for UNIX that let you run Mac apps on Sun workstations. Unlike bad option #1 it doesn’t require rebooting your Mac, and unlike bad option #2 it doesn’t require partitioning your hard disk, booting up Windows in a virtual environment, or giving up games. Word has it that World of Warcraft (for Win32) actually runs faster under WINE than under Windows itself.

Let’s see. This option is Open Source or (for certain versions) fairly inexpensive to license, works better than any other option, satisfies the it just works mantra, is unbelievably cool (as in “would make a kickass TV ad”), is already out there, and Apple hasn’t denied that it is working on it. Oh and it doesn’t sell more Windows licenses.

But, you know, maybe Apple will just buy Parallels.