Nexus 7

Nexus 7, iPhone 4, and Kindle Fire
Nexus 7, iPhone 4, and Kindle Fire

My Nexus 7 (16GB) showed up yesterday — two business days after I ordered it. Shortly after activation I received my $25 of Google Play credit which kind of nullified the non-free shipping (insofar as $25 Google Play credit can be considered to be worth $25).

Cutting to the chase: I like it. Overall, I like it better than the (nearly one year old) Kindle Fire. (I like the Kindle Fire a lot more now than when I got it because of significant improvements to the OS, including password protection for purchases.)

My wife and I recently changed jobs, as a result of which we both had to give up employer-provided iPad 2s, and we’re now using our old iPads when the girls let us. So the contrast in performance between the iPads and the newer Android (ish) devices couldn’t be made more stark, and by-and-large it’s not terribly stark. In flat out performance (e.g. loading complex web pages) the newer devices are noticeably faster, but in general use the iPads are more fluid and pleasant, which seems to indicate to me that there are fundamental architectural issues in Android which are never going to be fully addressed (much as Flash sucked in ways Adobe simply couldn’t fix).

Seven Inches

I find both the Kindle Fire and the Nexus 7 to be totally usable for reading, web surfing, and watching video. If anything, I would suggest they are — overall — slightly superior devices to the iPad for those purposes for the simple reason that smaller size, lower weight, and better performance trump display size.

As soon as it comes to use as a computer substitute, the iPad simply wins. I have bought Sketchbook for all three devices (I have the cheaper phone-centric version on the Kindle Fire). I am a huge sketchbook pro user and I find the 7″ version to be frustrating at best (at least the Kindle OS has been improved such that it’s not horribly jerky any more).

Android v. iOS

As alluded to before, based on the jerkiness of Android 4.1.1 (insert dessert name) on the Nexus 7, Android’s UI/graphics subsystem is significantly behind iOS and it’s not going to catch up. But aside from the niceties of UX animation, I’m not sure that matters. If UX mattered that much, Microsoft wouldn’t have been worth more in 1999 — in inflation-adjusted terms — than Apple is today. Yes, these are different times, but give most people a 30% discount and make their UX clunkier and less tasteful and they’ll say “why yes, I will buy a new PC”. (As Don Norman mentions in the Design of Everyday Things, even his family is not immune — opting for price or features over aesthetics and usability when purchasing things like stovetops.)

Icons: one area where the Nexus 7 is seriously (but trivially) handicapped is aesthetics. While the system as a whole looks quite nice, there are some truly horrible icons. For example, the “Applications” icon — a white circle with six small white squares in it — which manages to be unintuitive, ugly, impossible to remove or replace (as far as I can tell — I’m sure it can be replaced) and locked to the center of the “dock”. There are plenty of butt-ugly icons — the music app is a pair of orange headphones that look like an escapee from Program Manager circa 1994, and the book reader is a blue book cracked open to face away from the user.

System: I find the basic Android “launchpad”, at least for the Nexus 7, to be pretty confusing. The Kindle Fire was pretty bad, but I’ve gotten used to it, and find it quite pleasant now. That said, once I figured my way around there are some ways in which the Nexus 7’s UI is markedly superior to both iOS and (as I understand it not having used it for more than a few seconds) Windows Phone 7. In essence, “widgets” (which are provided by apps) allows you to allocate a subgrid of icons in the launcher screens to be a small panel owned by an app. E.g. a mail widget might display a small inbox.

If there were one feature of the Nexus 7 / Android which I would like to see Apple copy into iOS it would be widgets. On the screen of my Nexus 7 in the photo you can make out the Gmail widget, an analog clock widget (sigh), a calendar widget, and a Flipboard widget.

Applications: iOS is ahead but the gap is definitely closing. Angry Birds — yes. Sketchbook Pro — yes. Tiny Wings — no. Grand Theft Auto Chinatown Wars — no. And, notably, when you try to search for games like Infinity Blade the name autocompletes (it’s a common search) but you get nothing but crapware. Perhaps more importantly, Pages — no. iMovie — no. Apple itself makes nicer software than Google and this has follow-on effects on the ecology that don’t change (just look at how Microsoft’s poor and inconsistent application design degrades the entire Windows ecosystem, or how Apple’s worst missteps — metal! — have been imitated slavishly).

One area where Android excels compared to iOS is its openness. I’ve got Firefox and could easily install one of a number of programming environments that don’t have any of Apple’s restrictions (e.g. Codea on the iPad won’t let you share your code with anyone else, short of email and copy-and-paste). The fact that there are no compelling development tools on Android (that I can see) is pretty telling.

Installing Apps: when I first tried to install an app I got mysterious errors which turned out to be quite common (the solution was to turn Gmail syncing off and on). Once I got it working I found installing new apps markedly quicker and more painless than achieving the same thing in iOS (and I appreciate having automatic update as an option, although I’d prefer it to be on a per-app basis). (Also — hint to Apple — I’d like to be able to delete an app instead of update it.)

Silos: why is there a Message app and a Talk app? Why is there a Gmail app and an Email app? And why a navigation app and a Maps app? If Apple’s insistence on dividing communication into silos based on the medium is annoying, Google’s rises to mystifying. At least on my iPhone I can see email from Gmail, Exchange, and vanilla POP and IMAP in one place.

3D Game Performance: I know that the Nexus 7 should be running rings around the iPad (and iPhone 4) but from my brief experiments with 3d games (I tried Pocket Legends and Space Legends, both from the same vendor, which may be telling) I found games to run more choppily on the Nexus 7. In any event the difference wasn’t marked, so I call it a wash.

Notifications: Android fans make a lot hay over the superiority of Android notifications. Thus far, I’d call it a wash (perhaps Android’s the weird little icons in the sometimes-visible “menubar” will prove to be helpful).

Content Offerings: Google’s Play store is ubiquitous but a tad confusing. On the one hand they offer you the option to get everything from magazines to apps to movies in one place, on the other hand there are a ton of different storefronts that are all slightly different. One thing I found pretty annoying is that it’s not made clear whether the “price” of a movie is purchase or rent (or what resolution is being sold to you). And, in the end, it just seems to be the same stuff sliced up differently (insert joke about Taco Bell’s menu options). In the end, Kindle, Netflix, and Hulu+ all run dandy on the Nexus 7 (I noticed Super 8 was available via Netflix streaming and watched it last night).

Conclusions

None really. I like the Nexus 7, and I think it’s a worthy competitor to the iPad in a Windows vs. Mac kind of way (i.e. it’s not as good, but has some nice things I wish the iPad had, and the price is right). Unlike the Windows vs. Mac comparison, the ecosystem is squarely on Apple’s side (for the time being, at least) — the iPad has a significantly better game selection. Notably, in key areas Android still hasn’t caught up with the original iPad. My Kindle Fire languished largely unused for about six months (I’ve been using it quite a bit since having to return my iPad 2) — I might have more definite conclusions after the rumored iPad mini ships or doesn’t ship.