Getting an Nvidia 1070 (or similar) GPU working on a Mac Pro 5, 1

Victory!

I’ve been using a chipped Radeon 7950 in my 2012 Mac Pro for several years (it was a serious upgrade to my original 5770 or whatever it was that came with it) but eventually my Dell 2715Q (a 4K display) stopped working reliably with it at full resolution and I had to drop down to 1080p. Then it stopped working in 1080p.

I was pretty sure the problem was with the display (which also wasn’t working properly with my Macbook Pros), but the GPU had always been twitchy (sometimes not working on boot, and not driving all its display ports) so when Nvidia announced drivers for its latest GPUs, I figured what the heck?

Anyway, here’s the correct process along with gotchas from not doing it this way, since I found zero reliable guides online to help me.

Warning: if anything goes wrong you’ll need to screenshare into your Mac Pro from another Mac to see what’s going on, so make sure your Mac’s network connection is robust and you can screenshare into it before you do anything you’re going to regret. Luckily for me (since I fucked all this stuff up multiple times) our Macs can all “see” each other (mainly so I can get at parental controls on other Macs easily).

  1. Update your Mac to 10.12.4 (or whatever is current).
  2. Go to Nvidia’s website and download their out-of-date Mac OS X drivers, install them, and then update them in the control panel. I don’t know when you’re reading this but you want your drivers as up-to-date as possible.
  3. You may also want to install CUDA drivers, but that’s not critical.
  4. Shut down, unplug, power off, remove the Mac’s cover.
  5. I got a 1070 bundled with Mass Effect Andromeda. (Don’t care about the bundle, since I’ve got it for PS4 and hate Windows, but it was $50 cheaper than the same card without Mass Effect Andromeda. I don’t think much of Mass Effect Andromeda, but it’s definitely worth more than -$50.)
  6. The 1070 is physically a total pain to get into the Mac Pro (the 7950 seems to have been just as bad, but I have cheerfully lost all memory of it). Be careful to remove all the rubbery covers so that they don’t fall off on top of the PCI slot and cause you enormous consternation.
  7. The Mac Pro comes with two 6-pin power cables for graphics cards. The Nvidia 1070 takes one 8-pin cable, but there should be a 2x 6-pin to 8-pin adapter cable in the box. You’ll need that. Sadly it creates a lot of slack in your cables that will be snaked inside your otherwise tidy (if horribly dusty) Mac Pro.
  8. Make sure everything is securely hooked up. Close the box, plug it in, plug in displays, and boot. (If you’re using a wired network, make sure that’s plugged in.)
  9. Power on, wait for the chime, and hopefully you will be golden.

Troubleshooting

Here are the ways I fucked this up.

First, I didn’t realize the current version of Mac OS was 10.12.4, so I had 10.12.3 and installed the (January) version of the Nvidia drivers which then claimed to be up-to-date.

After I installed the card my Mac wouldn’t display jack shit from any port at any resolution. After trying two different displays and four different ports, I screen-shared into it and verified (a) it was working properly, (b) it could see the video card and recognize the vendor but couldn’t do anything with it, and (c) that the Nvidia panel could see the video card but not do anything with it.

I then found a post showing someone had successfully installed a 1080 on their Hackintosh with 10.12.4. Whoops! I installed 10.12.4 and rebooted. No dice. I went into the Nvidia panel and found it no longer claimed to be up-to-date, so I installed a new version, rebooted, and my Dell monitor came to life at a resolution I’d never seen it in before. (Easily fixed. I am now looking at my Mac Pro’s desktop in glorious 1440p, as God Steve intended.)

Tempted to switch to Windows

I love this laptop. I love the trackpad on the right. Where do I sign?
I love this laptop. I love the trackpad on the right. Where do I sign?

Before you decide my blog is suddenly interesting because I’m a hemi-demi-semi-prominent pro-Apple guy who is switching to Windows, hold your horses. It’s not. I’m not.

The correct, non-linkbaity headline should be:

“WTF Apple?! Macs suck compared to Windows PCs that are more expensive and which you can’t actually buy.”

All users of high-end Macs suffer from PC envy because there’s always a PC out there that scratches a particular hardware itch. E.g. nVidia has just released some insanely nice GPUs and on the Mac if you’re lucky you have a fairly recent mobile version of a mid-range nVidia GPU from last generation. Not even close to the same league. Similarly, the current generation Apple notebooks use Intel’s chipset from last year and are thus limited to 16GB of RAM. 16GB of RAM is so 2012 for fuck’s sake. (Heck, my 2012 Mac Pro has 36GB of RAM, it’s really just a 2010 Mac Pro, and it’s not even trying.)

So this morning I read another “fuck you and your lame-ass hardware and USB-C ports, I’m switching to Windows” post on Hacker News. I don’t remember if it was on the comments thread of the post or HN itself (since I can’t find either anymore) but there was a discussion of what Windows laptop (“other than a Dell XPS”) to get if you want to switch and don’t want a piece of shit (i.e. pretty much any Windows laptop). The replies were illuminating (including quite a few saying pretty much, ‘what do you mean “other than a Dell XPS”, that’s a piece of shit’ — a sentiment with which I can agree based on first person experience), and pointed at the Razer Blade and Razer Blade Pro.

So I took a look.

These are sold as high end laptops — CNC milled chassis, backlit keys with programmable colors, 1080P or 4K displays, (for which they provide an API, so you can have keys light up indicative of, say, the health of your team-mates in a multi-player game) and fantastic specs (e.g. nVidia 1080 in the Pro). In fact the specs were so good I simply wanted to know two things:

  • What is the battery life like?
  • How much?

The answers were:

  • We aren’t going to tell you.
  • More than a Macbook Pro (and, really, fair enough!), and by the way:
  • We don’t have any to sell and can’t tell you when we will.

Aha! Checkmate Apple. I guess there’s a reason why the laptops out there you can actually buy are either worse than Apple’s or cost about the same.

Free Business Idea

I’ve mentioned this idea casually many times, but I’m posting it here begging for someone to steal this idea and run with it. I think it’s technically simple to do, and there’s money in it.

The idea: time-shifting radio, i.e. TiVo for (car) radios.

Why?

  • NPR fund-raising drives
  • Commercial radio ads
  • Repeating songs (e.g. to find out their names)
  • Pausing and archiving interesting stories
  • Catching radio programs that are on at inconvenient times.

You know, like TiVo, but for radio. In your car.

Other benefits

  • Hurts commercial radio, more convenient than podcasts

Possible Downside

Hurts NPR fund-raising. But, seriously, you can pay Sirius/XM the cost of a typical NPR annual donation and NPR with get no fundraising at all.

Please, someone. Do this.

Dell P2715Q Display

About this Mac — Displays

So, I came across this Dell 4K display while visiting the new Nebraska Furniture that has opened close to us. (It’s quite an amazing place — retail’s revenge on Amazon.com — and it sells a lot more than furniture.) Anyway, I got it home, plugged it into my Macbook Pro 15″ (2014) and it just works (at 60Hz). That’s about all I can say about it.

AppleTV

Yesterday, 9to5 Mac noticed that Apple had rejigged its online store so as to position AppleTV as a product category. Also interestingly, Lee Clow has apparently hinted that, for the first time since 1984, Apple may be airing a super bowl spot. And then during Apple’s first quarter earnings call, Tim Cook foreshadowed new product categories for 2014. We’ve also had rumors of Apple cutting content deals over the last year that never turned into announcements.

It seems pretty clear that one new product category is going to be AppleTV. And here’s where things get really interesting.

Facts

  • Apple’s online store now treats AppleTV as a product category rather than an accessory.
  • Apple is not currently selling an Apple-branded 4K display (the 4K displays it is selling are from Sharp)
  • Apple’s OS-level support for 4K displays is conspicuously poor (they need to be treated as Retina displays)
  • iOS now provides proper (API) support for bluetooth game controllers
  • The price for high quality 4K displays is about to drop well under $1000
  • The current AppleTV does not support 4K displays
  • The current AppleTV does not support 802.11ac

Opinions

  • The last crop of consoles (Xbox One, PS4, Wii U) had the most anemic rollout (in terms of launch titles) in recent memory
  • The way AppleTV’s remote app works is primitive compared to the way Chromecast can be “handed” a playback task (and Apple knows this)
  • AppleTV currently needs a system update in order to add a new content channel; the tools for managing “apps” in AppleTV are primitive to put it mildly
  • There is already an ecosystem of iOS-compatible controllers and iOS games supporting those controllers
  • 4K displays blur or even erase the line between monitors and TVs

Rumors

  • Apple has bought a Super Bowl spot
  • Nintendo has suggested it is looking at developing titles for mobile platforms
  • Apple has been negotiating content deals with major players (movie studios, etc.) but it has borne no visible fruit as yet

Predictions

  • Apple is at last going to release an AppleTV console (whether it’s called AppleTV or not remains to be seen)
    • It will have access to major new sources of content
    • It will have an App Store
    • It will support Bluetooth controllers
    • It will support the use of other iOS devices as controllers
    • It will be powered by the A7 or something more powerful
    • If it is powered by a new chip (e.g. “A7x”) it will support 4K (the A7 can drive 2K)
    • It will have a shockingly good set of launch titles (how else to explain the lackluster launch titles for all the other consoles?)
    • It will not have a tuner or Cablecard support or any other horrific kludge
    • It may introduce streaming video with ads for content from networks (effectively on-demand playback of licensed content with ads)
    • It will cost $199-399 (I’d predict $199, but Apple might actually sell a range of products with varying storage capacities)
    • The ghastly Apple Remote iOS app will be given a proper overhaul, and work in more of a peer-to-peer manner (and be able to hand off tasks to the AppleTV)
  • An even smaller $99 version which doesn’t play games might continue as AppleTV Nano or some such
  • We’re going to see extensive 4K support across Apple’s product lines over the next 12 months
  • We’re going to see Apple-branded 4K displays (“Retina HD” perhaps?) designed to work seamlessly with all this new stuff